It's Sean!

UK freelance journalist, author
and writer Sean McManus

Printed from www.sean.co.uk. © Sean McManus.
You are here: Home > Blog Home > Sean McManus's Writing blog: How to use Scratch 2.0 in Adobe Flash on the Raspberry Pi

Sean's Tech and Writing Blog

How to use Scratch 2.0 in Adobe Flash on the Raspberry Pi

04 January 2017


Scratch is a programming language widely used in schools and colleges to teach programming, and there are two versions in popular use. The older version, Scratch 1.4, is the one that is installed on the Raspberry Pi in the Raspbian operating system. It's been extended to enable you to code GPIO projects in Scratch, controlling sensors and LEDs, for example.

Scratch 2.0 is a newer version of Scratch, which is based on Flash. There is a version of Scratch 2.0 you can download, but most people probably use it on the website where there are community features such as sharing, commenting and liking projects built-in.

There are a few new features in Scratch 2.0, including the ability to create your own blocks (which helps with structured programming), and the ability to clone sprites (which can be used to great effect in games and graphic effects). There are a few differences to block names too, and the Variables section has been renamed to Data. The Control blocks have been split into Control and Events blocks too.

One thing that isn't widely known is that you can now run Scratch 2.0 on the Raspberry Pi, because the Chromium browser in the Pixel desktop supports Adobe Flash on the Raspberry Pi. I've tested this on the Raspberry Pi 2 and the Raspberry Pi 3, and found the editor and the project window both run a bit slower than on a PC, but you can nevertheless now get the extra Scratch 2.0 features on the Pi. There was a bug in Treetop Catnap too, where one of the enemies got stuck, which doesn't happen on the PC. I wonder if that's because the graphical rendering is slightly different and the sprite believes it's touching a colour that I haven't put there. I tried using Chromium on the Model B+, but it doesn't appear that Adobe Flash works there.

Because Scratch 2.0 runs a bit slower, and the GPIO is not supported in Scratch 2.0, I'd still recommend Scratch 1.4 on the Raspberry Pi. But if you have found some projects that only work in Scratch 2.0 or want to see what's different, give it a go! If you're familiar with Scratch 2.0 already, perhaps from school or college, having the option to use the same programming language at home will probably appeal.

For Scratch inspiration, check out my books Cool Scratch Projects in Easy Steps and Scratch Programming in Easy Steps.

Bookmark and Share
Permanent link for this post.

Dip into the blog archive

June 2005 | July 2005 | August 2005 | September 2005 | October 2005 | November 2005 | December 2005 | January 2006 | February 2006 | March 2006 | April 2006 | May 2006 | June 2006 | July 2006 | August 2006 | September 2006 | October 2006 | November 2006 | December 2006 | January 2007 | February 2007 | March 2007 | April 2007 | May 2007 | June 2007 | July 2007 | August 2007 | September 2007 | October 2007 | November 2007 | December 2007 | January 2008 | February 2008 | March 2008 | April 2008 | May 2008 | June 2008 | July 2008 | August 2008 | September 2008 | October 2008 | November 2008 | December 2008 | January 2009 | February 2009 | March 2009 | April 2009 | May 2009 | June 2009 | July 2009 | August 2009 | September 2009 | October 2009 | November 2009 | December 2009 | January 2010 | February 2010 | March 2010 | April 2010 | May 2010 | June 2010 | August 2010 | September 2010 | October 2010 | November 2010 | December 2010 | March 2011 | April 2011 | May 2011 | June 2011 | July 2011 | August 2011 | September 2011 | October 2011 | November 2011 | December 2011 | January 2012 | February 2012 | March 2012 | June 2012 | July 2012 | August 2012 | September 2012 | October 2012 | December 2012 | January 2013 | February 2013 | March 2013 | April 2013 | June 2013 | July 2013 | August 2013 | September 2013 | October 2013 | November 2013 | December 2013 | January 2014 | February 2014 | March 2014 | April 2014 | May 2014 | June 2014 | July 2014 | August 2014 | September 2014 | October 2014 | November 2014 | December 2014 | January 2015 | February 2015 | March 2015 | April 2015 | May 2015 | June 2015 | September 2015 | October 2015 | December 2015 | January 2016 | February 2016 | March 2016 | May 2016 | July 2016 | August 2016 | September 2016 | October 2016 | November 2016 | December 2016 | January 2017 | April 2017 | Top of this page | RSS

Books by Sean McManus

Scratch Programming in Easy 

Steps

Scratch Programming in Easy Steps

Raspberry Pi For Dummies

Raspberry Pi For Dummies

Learn to program with the Scratch programming language, widely used in schools and colleges.

Set up your Pi, master Linux, learn Scratch and Python, and create your own electronics projects.

Super Skills: How to 

Code

Super Skills: How to Code

Web Design in Easy Steps

Web Design in Easy Steps

Learn how to code with this great new book, which guides you through 10 easy lessons to build up your coding skills.

Learn the layout, design and navigation techniques that make a great website. Then build your own using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

More books

©Sean McManus. www.sean.co.uk.